Coltharp Piano World has been serving the greater Memphis since 1960. The foundation of our business is not solely the instruments we sell but also the people we connect with music. It is historically proven that music is the universal language and one of the greatest assets to personal health and vitality. Our motivation is rooted in our passion for piano.

Did you know?
Playing music promotes brain health to a far greater degree than more passive, less-creative home-based activities like watching television, reading, or playing games. Indeed, studies have shown that the link between music and intelligence is more than merely theoretical. Practicing and playing piano sharpens hand-eye coordination, hones math and memorization skills, and enhances the brain’s ability to think creatively. Some studies even suggest that learning an instrument can increase one’s IQ.

Did you know?
More and more Americans are turning to a millennia-old technique for relieving stress— music. Music has a definite therapeutic value for a large number of mental and physical health issues. The myriad of health benefits ranges from relieving depression in adults to helping children with Attention Deficit Disorder learn to focus better. In fact, studies in Japan have reported on the Music Industry Association’s Recreation Music Making website that playing music has improved immune system performance in corporate workers. Music relieved loneliness and boosted self-esteem in senior citizens. Music also relieved stress and improved the moods of 75 nursing students studied at Allegany College of Maryland.

Did you know?
A ten-year study, tracking more than 25,000 students, shows that music-making improves test scores. Regardless of socioeconomic backgrounds, students involved with music got higher marks on standardized tests than those who had no musical background. The test scores studied were not only on standardized tests, such as the SAT, but also were on reading proficiency exams.

Did you know?
Music majors are the most likely group of college graduates to be admitted to medical school. Physician and biologist Lewis Thomas studied the undergraduate majors of medical school applicants. He found that 66% of music majors who applied to medical school were admitted. That is the highest percentage of any group. In comparison, 44% of biochemistry majors were admitted. Also, a study of 7,500 university students revealed that music majors scored the highest reading scores among all majors, including English, biology, chemistry, and math.